Movie Review: Justice League

Movie Review: Justice League

Justice League film poster.jpgThis film showcases Batman as bringing in the other superheroes and forming the Justice League. By far, this movie outshines Batman vs. Superman. However, in a world with X-men and Marvel movies, it pales.

The cast did a wonderful job, but they had bad writing, plot holes, and an illogical villain.

When the bad guy,  Steppenwolf, shows up he defeats the Amazons easily. Later in the movie, Diana tells the story of how it took the Old Gods, Mankind, both Amazons and Atlantians to imprison him. However, when Steppenwolf returns and this time unites the three boxes of power, he’s no stronger than he was when this round of superheroes fought him. AND the key to his demise is one superhero that seems impossible to beat (unless you’ve got kryptonite)

To me, the movie was too easily ended. The bad guy not so tough and Superman put him down without much effort.

That’s one of the many reasons I like Marvel better than DC movies – their characters show their flaws, their weaknesses. And no one hero is all-amazingly powerful. Really, it’s like an evil six-year-old fighting an all powerful warlord. No suspense.

I did love Gal Gadot as Diana Prince / Wonder Woman. AND enjoyed the comic relief of Ezra Miller as Barry Allen / Flash

My rating 3.8 stars out of 5

Author Photo Andrea

Andrea R. Cooper writes fantasy, paranormal,  and historical romance.

Her favorite childhood memories revolved around creating vibrant characters for her friends and then acting out their adventures. Inside her fantasy worlds of darkened forests, dragon-filled glades, and iced islands, nothing was banned. From the ethereal Elvin to the most maligned Vampires, all were welcome in her fictional realities, a stark contrast to her home, where the magical and mythical was forbidden.

www.andreaRcooper.com

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Movie Review: Thor – Ragnarok

Movie Review: Thor – Ragnarok

Thor Ragnarok poster.jpgThor (Chris Hemsworth) has searched for two years for the Infinity stones. After no luck and continuing nightmares about Ragnarok, he returns to Asgard to find his brother Loki pretending to be Odin.

The two find their father on Earth and find out about their half-sister, Hela who has been imprisoned by Odin.

At the first face-off between Thor and Hela, she not only catches his hammer and is able to hold it, but shatters it. Of course, she is the goddess of death – and as firstborn – she claims the Asgard.

Thor and Loki are separated on their way through the Bifrost with Hela chasing them and land on  Sakaar. Loki has made friends with the Grand Master who collects champions to fight in his Gladiator-like battles. Thor has to battle the current champion to win his freedom. And he faces off with The Hulk!

I love Tessa Thompson as Valkyrie! And look forward to her character in future movies.

There are lots of humorous moments in

Can’t say too much about this movie, except that Marvel knows how to bring heart, humor, and great action and storylines into their movies seamlessly.

Did you know that Thor’s line when he first sees he has to fight Hulk, “I know him! He’s a friend from work!” was thought up by a kid?

“Hemsworth told Entertainment Weekly at their San Diego Comic-Con studio the unlikely story behind the “friend from work” line:

“We had a young kid, a Make-A-Wish kid on set that day. He goes, ‘You know, you should say, ‘He’s a friend from work!’”

That story just makes the line even better. The Make-A-Wish Foundation is a charity organization that gives kids struggling with terminal diseases a “wish,” sometimes in the form of a trip, a visit from their favorite superhero, or something of the like. This unnamed kid’s wish was apparently to visit the set of Thor: Ragnarok, and he made more of an impact on the movie than he probably thought he would. Now, he’ll stand in the lexicon of greatest Marvel lines ever.”1

My rating 4.8 stars out of 5

Author Photo Andrea

Andrea R. Cooper writes fantasy, paranormal,  and historical romance.

Her favorite childhood memories revolved around creating vibrant characters for her friends and then acting out their adventures. Inside her fantasy worlds of darkened forests, dragon-filled glades, and iced islands, nothing was banned. From the ethereal Elvin to the most maligned Vampires, all were welcome in her fictional realities, a stark contrast to her home, where the magical and mythical was forbidden.

www.andreaRcooper.com

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Biblography:
1 – http://www.slashfilm.com/thor-ragnarok-friend-from-work-make-a-wish/

Why representation matters

Sigils and Spells: A Limited Edition Urban Fantasy Collection

Why representation matters

When I was a kid, I didn’t care about diversity. Just playing. If you were a kid and nice, then you were my friend. Only a person’s name and their character was what was important to me, not their race. Other kids called me names, because of my friends, and threw rocks at me and them. But a true person reveals their heart by their actions and words, not the color of their skin.

As an adult, I watched TV shows like The Cosby Show, Living Single, It’s a Different World, Fresh Prince, Martin, and many, many more. I loved them because they were funny and had good plots and dialogue. Now I watch Luke Cage, Queen Sugar, Shots Fired, and others.

I wept when I read the book, The Help and The Invention of Wings and The Secret Life of Bees.

In my own writing, I try to write diverse characters. But even then, I feel like I fell short of reality and painting my worlds in the vast array of wonder.  I beta read for other authors and came across an interesting historical western romance. But as I read, something occurred to me: there were only white people in the story. This was in the Nineteenth century. When I mentioned this to the author, she didn’t respond. However, I can assume she realized it was true because her second book after that one she sent me to critique had two diverse main characters. Sometimes, I don’t think we realize that we, as authors, are showing the reality of our diverse world.

I had an idea for a new Urban Fantasy series with a sidekick who was not white. Then I thought, why stop there? Why not have the ‘sidekick’ have her own story, her own adventures?

blood lust.jpg ebookSo I wrote Book 2, Thorns & Blood series, featuring a  dhampir (half-vampire/ half-human) woman who hunts rogue vampires for a living. She’s has both African American and Native American heritage.

Being diverse, to me, means a more wonderful world full of amazing people who are like everyone else. Wanting and needing love and acceptance. I have friends of all nationalities and genealogy so why can’t fiction and movies and shows reflect that?

Not everyone feels this way.

“”Star Trek: Discovery,” the latest entry in the “Star Trek” universe, features two women of color – Michelle Yeoh as the starship captain and Sonequa Martin-Green as her first officer.” 1 However, fans were in an uproar that the two main characters were: 1) not white and 2) not male.

What??? Star Trek is based on aliens and space and the future. Is the future going to remain white men rule everything? Maybe a woman captain would be a good thing. In Alien: Covenant, having Janet “Danny” Daniels as their leader might have saved all their lives if she’d been in charge from the beginning.

What about you? Does diversity and representation matter to you?

#diversitymatters #representationmatters

Today, help support diversity and representation, and grab your copy of this great set of full-length stories before it’s gone!

 

Amazon

iBooks

Nook

Kobo

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1 – http://www.chicagotribune.com/entertainment/tv/ct-star-trek-discovery-diversity-20170623-story.html

Cheri Winters got hooked on Urban Fantasy through Kim Harrison, Patricia Briggs, and Laurel K. Hamilton. Now Cheri writes her stories with kick-ass heroines battling their way through adventure and mayhem.

When not writing, Cheri practices Muay Thai and Karate or catches up reading her favorite authors.

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